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Acton Wine & Spirits Co. Grand Tasting Event

The Acton Wine & Spirit Co. Annual Grand Tasting will be held on Saturday, November 5th, between 2 and 5 P.M.  We will have food, and the discounting will be heavy. 
Tasting offerings will be of a varied selection from around the world. We will be tasting over 100 wines, and we will have two craft liquor tables with tastes to inspire you! Food will be served by Not Your Average Joe’s. There will be no charge, and no reservations are necessary. Come on down and join us for an afternoon of fun and exploration! We look forward to seeing you!

New & Notable – Casa Noble Tequila’s

The following reviews are from Drinkhacker

Casa Noble Crystal (Blanco) – Pungent on the nose, with deep, deep agave notes, white pepper, and cayenne. The body isn’t nearly the agave bomb you might be expecting. It is both sweet and peppery, but not really vegetal at all. Instead you’ll find notes of tart lemon juice, caramel sauce, and a touch of rhubarb. Very well crafted. Everything a blanco should be. A / 34.99

Casa Noble Reposado – Spends 364 days in French white oak, making this a very well-aged reposado. The nose has that trademark peppery pungency of the blanco, but with an undercurrent of stone fruit — peaches and apricots — to give it some balance. The body is very fruity, slight tropical notes atop lemon and oranges, plus notes of chocolate peppermints and ample wood-driven vanilla. It doesn’t drink nearly as leathery and “old” as my prior comments indicated, but perhaps that’s just my increased experience with tequila over the last five years talking. Still delightful, either way. A / 49.99

Casa Noble Anejo – Aged “to perfection” for two years in French white oak. Nicely dark, but not overdone. That peppery agave is still front and center on the nose, with more of a caramel/marshmallow character attempting to overtake it. The body shows that it’s a silky dessert sipper all the way. The palate starts with bittersweet chocolate and graham crackers, then hops to burnt caramel and dark brown sugar notes. The fruit is absent save for a little flamed orange peel, which plays nice with the molten chocolate cake character that bubbles on and on on the finish. A benchmark anejo that mixes a racy attack with a silky sweet finish. A+ / 57.99

Hudson Single Malt Whiskey

Hudson Single Malt Whiskey is made from 100% whole grain malted barley,  then it is aged in heavily charred new Missouri white oak barrels,  aged under 4 years and bottled at 92 proof.  All though it shares the same grain bill as Scotch, American rules require new oak barrels be used for every batch.  Unlike Irish and Scotch whiskeys that reuse whiskey barrels.  The new charred oak barrels give a bolder and woody flavor showing a rich amber color with notes of vanilla, caramel and finishing with a hint of spice.  Made at Tuthilltown Gristmill in Gardener New York, Hudson Whiskeys are some of the finest I have sampled and they were given the Best Artisan Distiller Award in 2010.  Enjoy straight or add a drop of water.  This is a must try American Single Malt.

Moonshine

It’s here! Jr Johnson’s Midnight Moonshine in mason jars.  Made from American corn and triple distilled for a smooth and clean finish.  Choose from three kinds of shine, original, apple pie and strawberry.  Use it to create and infuse your own cocktails or just drink it straight the way Jr Johnson intended.  My favorite is moonshine and lemonade.  Fill a glass with ice than add 1 and a half shots of the original shine and top off with homemade lemonade.  You can also create some moonshine jello shots.  All three styles retail for $21.99 and are available in both Acton and Marlboro Locations.

The classic Martini

I’ve recently been doing some research on the original recipes of classic cocktails such as the Martini. Now I’m not talking about Vodka-tini, Strawberry-tini, or any of the thousands of other tini’s that you see on menu’s today. I’m talking about the original Martini. It’s made with Gin.
I was in a bar/restaurant just last night and I told the young man who arrived at our table that I was in the mood for a Martini. He asked what kind of Vodka I preferred.
That is just wrong.
What really surprised me was the reliance on bitters in the drinks of the 1920’s. Even in Martini’s. While most modern recipes do not even mention bitters, they were apparently very prevalent in the classic cocktails of the 20’s.
This from Wilkpedia – A bitters is traditionally an alcoholic preparation flavored with botanical matter such that the end result is characterized by a bitter or bittersweet flavor. Numerous longstanding brands of bitters were originally developed as patent medicines, but are now sold as digestifs and cocktail flavorings in the contemporary market.
So anyways back to the classic Martini. After numerous tries (I assure you, not all in the same night, and never during daylight hours) I have arrived at this recipe that I kind of like…
Crushed ice
2 1/2 ounces Green Mountain Organic Gin
1/2 ounce Dolin Dry Vermouth
2 dashes of Bitter Truth Old Time Aromatic Bitters
2 Blue cheese stuffed olives
Fill a large Martini Glass with crushed ice. Wait for glass to get cold. Have patience. Fill your shaker with Gin, Vermouth, and Bitters. Pour ice from Martini Glass into shaker. Stir about 25 times vigorously. Stick a toothpick into olives and place in glass. Strain drink into glass.
And dump the ice! I have personally never understood why a bartender would ask if you wanted the ice (quite a few do). It’s done it’s job!
Enjoy. (limit 2)